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BlahX3
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2011-08-15
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Vehicles
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What is this?

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What is this?

Comments for: What is this?
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: August 15, 2011 10:31PM

small pry-bar with a ground down punch
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: August 15, 2011 10:32PM

or an old horseshoe nail depending on size
GAK67 Report This Comment
Date: August 15, 2011 11:09PM

A tool for laying railway iron on wooden sleepers.
woberto Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 12:28AM

I think it looks like a tommy bar,
but I'm not playing until someone tells me what this thing is...
Mrkim Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 12:40AM

A lotta my brother mechs would call this a crows foot/line-up bar.

For most applications where you'd wanna pry on a part they're not very functional and are prone to having the tip break off the prying end if you actually try to do anything serious with 'em. They do work great as a long handled line-up punch particularly if you need to use a hammer to line up the 2 parts.

I have a variety of sizes/lengths of these in my box and they pretty much stay there spinning
smiley sticking its tongue out

smoking
smiley
Onyma Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 02:21AM

woberto: What that item is is actually unknown though it appears to have been used in sheep sheering somehow.

Article: [games.historycolorado.org]
SpazzII Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 06:09AM

Marlinspike, Crows-foot.
Birdbath?
quasi Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 09:02AM

I hate to state the obvious, but it's a photograph.
BlahX3 Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 10:47AM

It's not like any marlinspike I've ever seen and though it may be a type of crows foot I haven't seen any like this either but if Kim says that's what the mechs call it that's good enough for me, although the pics of those I've seen are very different, there's no forked claw. It's about 18" long. I have found it pretty useful at times when needing to apply brute force to a small area and I've been grateful to have it but it mostly goes unused.

I thought it might be something used by steel workers or maybe loggers for setting chokers or something like that. Since I found it up here in Oregon loggers makes sense. I sharpened the tip since this picture so I can use it to punch holes in a burn barrel, if that works out. Might be easier to drill the holes though.
Mrkim Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 12:18PM

Duh, brain fart .... this would be called a ladysfoot, a crowsfoot would be forked (*facepalm*)


smoking
smiley
BlahX3 Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 01:03PM

Cool Kimster. Yep, that's exactly what it is from looking at pics online. Thank you buddy.
pro_junior Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 02:48PM

I have one of these, appears identical to the one in the pic, I've not named it...
one thing that I use it for is to jab small holes into the dirt, for planting propagation cuttings from plants smoking
smiley
BlahX3 Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 04:38PM

It's definitely a "lady's foot" like the Kimster said. They sell for $40-60 new depending on size. I've found it useful for different things. I'm glad I have it, it's come in handy a few times when I'm scratching my head thinking WTF tool can I use for this deal? When I first found it around 20 years ago in a garage I thought to myself I have no idea what this is or is good for. I've since found several uses.
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 05:57PM

use 2 of them for prying off the brake parts from a chain hoist without removing the gears and shafts

oh, and Blah, the best head and back scratcher i have found is a spaghetti claw...plastic preferably.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 16/08/2011 05:58PM by fossil_digger.
woberto Report This Comment
Date: August 16, 2011 09:11PM

I have several that are similar, we just call them Tommy bars.
Printers would use them regularly to rotate bearing cups. The cups have holes in them for this purpose.
Kinda see it here
Also there are several concentric adjustments on a press that require the same tool.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 16/08/2011 11:02PM by woberto.
90130_ Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 02:40AM

?



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 18/08/2011 02:17AM by 90130_.
BlahX3 Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 11:53AM

Pictures I've seen of tommy bars are a t-handled wrench and nothing like this, pics of lady's foot bars are exactly the same as this. I know people call things by all sorts of names, one of my favorites is a "goddamnit" as in, "Please hand me that goddamnit over there."
Mrkim Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 12:05PM

I saw an ad for Metric and Standard crescent wrenches the other day, whatta hoot that was. They were sellin a set of 6, 8, 10 and 12" Metric wrenches and then a set of 8, 10 and 12" standard wrenches (*facepalm*)

Gotta love that marketing genius eh (*butt*)

smoking
smiley
BlahX3 Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 01:27PM

That doesn't make a whole lot of sense. That's a different kind of goddamnit. smiling
smiley
GAK67 Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 02:50PM

Mrkim - that reminds me of a story I heard a few years ago. A farmer goes into his local rural supply store and says he wants to buy 30 foot of polythene pipe. "I'm sorry sir, but we use the metric system here," he was told, so he does a quick mental calculation and asks for 10m. "Certainly sir, and what size would you like, half inch, or three quarter?"

It would be interesting to know how many people fell for the ad you saw.
BlahX3 Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 03:27PM

BTW, I found that a lady foot pry bar is also called a rolling head pry bar. Learn something new every day.
Mrkim Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 03:48PM

Yeah here in the US our dumbasses are stuck with the old standard stuff, which sucks to me since I like metric better ... except when it comes to measurin thousands, there I stay with inches (*facepalm*)

smoking
smiley
BlahX3 Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 04:41PM

I'm kind of the same way. Metric does make more sense in some cases and in others standard seems more applicable. I suppose it really comes down to what you're accustomed to and/or have to put up with. What drives me bonkers are things like some vehicles that use a combination of both. Another thing that is crazy is some things say a screw is so many mm long when in reality it is exactly some fraction of an inch instead.
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 07:32PM

i always enjoyed this mind fuck:
.750ml bottle is a fifth
1.0 liter is a liter
and a 1.75 ltr is a half gallon.

totally
lost



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 17/08/2011 07:41PM by fossil_digger.
BlahX3 Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 09:15PM

A half gallon is 1.89270589 liters, not 1.75 liters, which is 0.14270589 liter difference; a significant 4.8254601980279012756056010304566 oz.
A fifth is 0.757082356 liters not ".750 ml" (which should have read either .750 liters or 750 ml and should have been rounded UP to 780 ml if you're rounding numbers and is still wrong - three times wrong at once.)
The obvious 1.0 liter = 1 liter, a big duh and doesn't count and you get an F.
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 09:35PM

no the liquor industry gets that grade
woberto Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 09:45PM

Feet and inches are for working with timber, if you're a quarter inch out nobody cares.
Millimeters are for steel fabrication, much tighter tolerances.
I'm all for metric but there are times when you can communicate much better in feet and inches.
Other imperial measures will fade out one day me thinks.
GAK67 Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 09:54PM

Things change over time. That story I told earlier I heard a few years ago not long after NZ went from imperial to metric. You don't get half inch pipe any more, it's now 12mm and 2 inch pipe is now 50mm (not only in name, but also in measurement). The only time I really see imperial measurements here now is in tools because you still get imperial nuts and bolts on stuff imported from either the US or (to a lesser extent) the UK.
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 10:13PM

i'll take a pic of the 4 lady's feet i have tomorrow and post 'em
Mrkim Report This Comment
Date: August 17, 2011 10:51PM

Yeah Blah, the 80s GM cars were the worst for their standard/metric mix and match fun. I remember an 80 Olds Omega I had with the body & suspension hardware in standard sizes and the engine was all metric, whatta mindfuck that was to work on!

Here's a fun fact I learned when workin with bearings. All bearings and seals are made to metric specs, even ones that match up to inch sizes. Bearing catalogs here will typically show the specs in inch sizes because most people think in these terms but they're actually built to a metric spec.

Here's another interesting difference between inch and metric sizes when it comes to bolts. Inch size bolts like a 1/4 - 20 means the diameter is 1/4" with 20 threads per inch. A close metric comparison would be a 6mm X 1.0 which means the bolt is a 6mm diameter with a distance of 1.0mm from crest to crest of the threads.

GAK & 'berto, most of our material items here are measured in inches like in steel bar and flat stock, pipe, wood, ducting materials and such though you do come across some variations in that from time to time. If however you need a piece of 12mm shafting for a part on a machine you typically have few sources to find it available from, while you can find 1/2" rod stock at any steel supplier. And, if you're dealing with a machine shop they'll want the specs expressed in inches and thousandths of an inch, though some are conversant in metric figures, most prefer inches, which works great for me, so ...

Like John Prine said : "Ooh baby, It's a big old goofy world" rock on

smoking
smiley



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 17/08/2011 10:56PM by Mrkim.
woberto Report This Comment
Date: August 18, 2011 12:15AM

1980's Mazdas can be taken 90% apart with a 10mm & 13mm spanner.
In fact they made it a double-ended spanner with 10mm one end and 13mm the other.
Mrkim Report This Comment
Date: August 18, 2011 01:05AM

I hear ya 'berto and the simplicity of the asian auto manufacturers fastener choices is a real plus when workin on 'em. Mitsus use 8, 10, 12 & 14mm headed fasteners with a very few 17s and then a 22mm for the crank bolt and a 32mm for the drive train retaining nuts which means only a very few tools will be required to do everything.

Some of the best tools to come along for mechanics in YEARS are the new smaller head version ratcheting wrenches (spanners), wobble drive socket extensions and ball end allen wrenches (hex keys). These are definite musts for any serious mech these days to round out their arsenal.

And a serious thanks is also due GE for pushin silicone sealers over the old school nastiness of havin to use Permatex No. 1 and No. 2 we used to have to use for this purpose. That nasty gooey concoction was a terrible excuse for a sealant and tended to harden and crack out over the long term which silicone never does and ... I can get it in caulk tubes which makes it even easier to apply and store thumbs
down

smoking
smiley
woberto Report This Comment
Date: August 18, 2011 02:50AM

Mazdas used to have cork gaskets on rockers & sumps... what were they thinking?
Mrkim Report This Comment
Date: August 18, 2011 04:14AM

Yep, cork gaskets have mostly gone the way of the dodo, and thankfully so! Most have been replaced with either rubber, urethane or just applied silicone anymore which is a big plus. I get a kick outta generic Mitsu gasket sets that come with an oil pan gasket since even Mitsu never used a pan gasket!

I hear lots of people talk about the good ol days of cars as if they were somehow better then than now which is total BS tongue
sticking out smiley

smoking
smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 18/08/2011 04:15AM by Mrkim.
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: August 18, 2011 09:57PM

pro_junior Report This Comment
Date: August 19, 2011 01:45PM

my old '77 Pontiac Catalina overheated on the way home from working swing-shift one summer night, pulled over and I could see I was leaking around the thermostat housing, so I pulled out the thermostat, and sure enough it was broken. tossed it in the trunk and put the housing back on, I made a gasket out of an empty coors light box I found on the side of the Interstate...drove it that way for a couple of weeks before I finally got around to installing a new thermostat..

this reminds me of another time, at band camp, I was driving a '95 long nose pete in central california on a hot summer day, when I blew out the top radiator hose..had a split about 4 inches long...was running with another driver and we both pulled off onto the shoulder of an off ramp..we wrapped some shop towels around the hose, then secured the rags with a dozen or so heavy-duty zip ties, then wrapped all that up in some good 'ol duct-tape, then another handful of zip ties...rolled another 150 miles no problems, to a shop where I could get a replacement hose. I was tempted to run the patched hose until it burst again, just to see how long it would go, but decided to go ahead and put the new hose on while I had a decent place to work...
Mrkim Report This Comment
Date: August 19, 2011 03:01PM

Yep, lotsa stuff will work in a bind and a bit of ingenuity is definitely bettern bein stuck some where. I bet we could have quite an intersting forum thread about lotsa similar roadside repairs as well as homeboy engineering fixes 'round the house grinning
smiley

smoking
smiley
quasi Report This Comment
Date: August 19, 2011 03:51PM

I worked for years at a wholesale business that sells waterwell pumps and repair parts among many other things associated with producing and moving water. Those pumps still typically use cork and paper gaskets. One of our best customers who became a pretty good friend over the years is a die hard Ford fan. One day he walked into the shop and asked for "one of those Starite (pump) gaskets that looks like a Chevy rear end." Though I have no preference, of course I had to say, "It takes a Ford guy to know what a Chevy rear end looks like." He eventually forgave me for the statement.
Mrkim Report This Comment
Date: August 19, 2011 08:04PM

One of my bestest ol car buddies was a die hard Chevy guy and I was, at the time, a die hard Ford guy, which led to lotsa ribbin & such.

One day he shows up in a T shirt sayin "I'd rather PUSH a Chevy than DRIVE a Ford" and sportin a big shit eatin grin from ear to ear. I looked at him said, "Yeah, and you probably will too!". Ol Robert was a good sport about it and just calmly said "Fuuuuuck you ... you asshole" grinning
smiley

smoking
smiley
woberto Report This Comment
Date: August 20, 2011 06:15AM

On the back of a lot of Toyota Landcrusers, the tow point has a sticker reading "attach Mitsubishi tow cable here"...