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rating
2.57
votes
14
views
945
uploader
ORLANDO399
comments
14
date added
2007-09-17
category
Stupid
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WHERE IS THIS?

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WHERE IS THIS?

Comments for: WHERE IS THIS?
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: September 17, 2007 04:18PM

Athens
ORLANDO399 Report This Comment
Date: September 17, 2007 04:27PM

close but no cigarsmoking
smiley
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: September 17, 2007 04:55PM

a video game
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: September 17, 2007 05:09PM

Alexandria
ORLANDO399 Report This Comment
Date: September 17, 2007 05:34PM

Keep on guessing fossil,it's easier than you think
Anonymous Report This Comment
Date: September 17, 2007 07:26PM

It's the "Friedensengel" in Munich!
fossil_digger Report This Comment
Date: September 17, 2007 07:35PM

that has a square base and the column is different, but i had to check. smiling
smiley
ORLANDO399 Report This Comment
Date: September 18, 2007 12:36AM

I can't believe nobody has gotten this yet.anwser tommorow morninggrinning
smiley
ORLANDO399 Report This Comment
Date: September 18, 2007 12:47AM

Hint....one of the most famous european cities in the world
Thanatos Report This Comment
Date: September 18, 2007 01:10AM

Berlin Victory column
The Victory Column (German: Siegessäule) is a famous sight of Berlin. Designed by Heinrich Strack after 1864 to commemorate the Prussian victory in the Danish-Prussian war, by the time it was inaugurated on 2 September 1873 Prussia had also defeated Austria in the Austro-Prussian War (1866) and France in the Franco-Prussian War (1870/1871), giving the statue a new purpose. Different from the original plans, these later victories in the so-called Unification Wars inspired the addition of the bronze sculpture of Victoria, 8.3 meters high and weighing 35 tonnes, designed by Friedrich Drake. Berliners, with their fondness for giving nicknames to famous buildings, call the statue Goldelse, meaning something like "golden Lizzy".

Anchored on a solid fundament of polished red granite, the column sits on a hall of pillars with a glass mosaic designed by Anton von Werner.

The column itself consists of four solid blocks of sandstone, three of which are decorated by cannon pipes captured from the enemies of the aforementioned three wars. The fourth ring is decorated with golden garlands and was added in 1938/39 when the column was moved to its present location.

The foundation is decorated with four bronze reliefs showing the three wars and the victorious marching of the troops into Berlin. They were created by four Berlin sculptors:

Moritz Schulz (1825–1904)
Karl Keil (1838–1889)
Alexander Calandrelli (1834-1903)
and Albert Wolff (1814–1892)
The relief decoration had to be removed on request of the French allied forces in 1945, probably to prevent Germans from being reminded of former victories in war, especially the defeat of the French in 1871. It was restored for the 750 years anniversary of Berlin in 1987 by the French president at that time, François Mitterrand.

Surrounded by a street circle with heavy car traffic, pedestrians can reach the column through four tunnels, built in 1941 to plans by Albert Speer. Via a steep spiral staircase of 285 steps, the physically fit may climb up almost to the top of the pillar, to right underneath the statue, for a small fee and a spectacular view over the Tiergarten.

Even many Berliners do not know that originally the column was erected with a height of merely 50.66 meters opposite the Reichstag building. It originally stood in Königsplatz (now Platz der Republik). In preparation of executing the monumental plans to redesign Berlin into Welthauptstadt Germania, in 1939, the Nazis relocated the pillar to its present location at the Großer Stern (Great Star), a large intersection on the visual city axis that leads from the former Berliner Stadtschloss (Berlin City Palace) through the Brandenburg Gate to the western parts of Berlin. At the same time, the pillar was augmented by another 7.5 meters, giving it its present height of 66.89 meters. The monument survived World War II without much damage. The relocation of the monument probably saved it from destruction, as its old site in front of the Reichstag was destroyed in the war.




[www.cedcc.psu.edu]
ORLANDO399 Report This Comment
Date: September 18, 2007 01:23AM

trying to rain on my parade huh?Party poopersmiling
bouncing smiley
Thanatos Report This Comment
Date: September 18, 2007 01:28AM

the finger
smiley

just like to feel like a know it all...lol

now if I just knew those six numbers plus the powerball.
ORLANDO399 Report This Comment
Date: September 18, 2007 01:31AM

smiling
bouncing smiley
paramax911 Report This Comment
Date: September 27, 2007 09:23AM

London, Trafalgar Square